survival of germanic paganism in the early Christian period of Anglo-Saxon England.
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survival of germanic paganism in the early Christian period of Anglo-Saxon England. by Valerie Ainscough

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Published .
Written in English


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Dissertation (B.A. History) - King Alfred"s College, 1979.

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Open LibraryOL21685675M

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The word pagan is a Latin term that was used by Christians in Anglo-Saxon England to designate non-Christians. In Old English, the vernacular language of Anglo-Saxon England, the equivalent term was hæðen ("heathen"), a word that was cognate to the Old Norse heiðinn, both of which may derive from a Gothic word, haiþno. Both pagan and heathen were terms that carried pejorative overtones. Germanic paganism was polytheistic, revolving around the veneration of various deities were worshipped widely across the Germanic lands, albeit under different names. Other deities were simply local to a specific locality, and are mentioned in both Anglo-Saxon and Icelandic texts, in the latter of which they are described as being "the land spirits that live in this land".   Finally, the subject of the survival of pre-Germanic paganism, interactions with the encroaching Anglo-Saxons will be discussed. This article was written due to some consternation which was raised, when reading Mr. Bob Trubshaw in the articles on his website, titled Anglo-Saxon Twilight (Trubshaw, ). Notably, Trubshaw’s writings that the.   Anglo-Saxon Paganism is based on Germanic paganism which carried over with germans during the Anglo-Saxon invasion of the British Isles. This type of religion precedes Christianity and is polytheistic, unlike the monotheistic beliefs of most modern religions such as Christianity, Judaism and Islam.

44 H. R. Ellis Davidson, “Gods and Heroes in Stone,” The Early Cultures , pp. –; this important article, pp. –, has been used as the basis for the following, even though the relationships of Christian Devil, Loki, and smith have not been fully developed in it. For the Gosforth Cross, cf. Berg, Knut, “The Gosforth Cross,” Journal of the Warburg and Courtauld. Anglo-Saxon paganism, sometimes termed Anglo-Saxon heathenism, Anglo-Saxon pre-Christian religion, or Anglo-Saxon traditional religion, refers to the religious beliefs and practices followed by the Anglo-Saxons between the 5th and 8th centuries AD, during the initial period of Early Medieval England.A variant of the Germanic paganism found across much of north-western Europe, it . Another remarkable example of the blending of Germanic and Christian traditions is the longest surviving Anglo-Saxon poem, the epic Beowulf. Telling of a pagan hero in a pagan society, the epic is written from an explicitly Christian point of view and incorporates influences from the ancient Roman epic, Virgil’s Aeneid. I would argue that you cannot get into the early Anglo Saxon mind set without understanding something of the Paganism of that period, even when it had officially ceased to exist. According to the 6th century writer Gildas, the first of the heathen Saxon newcomers in the 5th century were allegedly Hengest and Horsa, two warrior leaders brought.

  The withdrawal of Roman troops in c and the immigration of pagan German settlers into south-eastern Britain threatened the survival of the Christianity of the Romano-British church, which largely disappeared from the Anglo-Saxon areas. At the same time, however, the faith became markedly stronger in the south-west, west and north of the island. Early Germanic culture refers to the culture of the early Germanic y derived from a synthesis of Proto-Indo-European and indigenous Northern European elements, the Germanic culture developed out of the Nordic Bronze came under significant external influence during the Migration Period, particularly from ancient Rome.. The Germanic peoples eventually overwhelmed the Western. Germanic paganism refers to the ethnic religion practiced by the Germanic peoples from the Iron Age until Christianisation during the Middle both archaeological remains and literary sources, it is possible to trace a number of common or closely related beliefs throughout the Germanic area into the Middle Ages, when the last pagan areas in Scandinavia were Christianized. Anglo-Saxon paganism refers to the religious beliefs and practices followed by the Anglo-Saxons between the fifth and eighth centuries AD, during the initial period of Early Medieval England.A variant of the Germanic paganism found across much of north-western Europe, it encompassed a heterogeneous variety of disparate beliefs and cultic practices. [1].